Anik has contributed radio pieces and documentaries to CBC Radio’s Ideas, The Current, and Dispatches, ABC Radio National's Earshot and Hindsight, and Monocle. She worked for a number of years as a full-time producer for both of Radio Netherlands Worldwide’s premiere English-language magazine shows, Earth Beat and The State We’re In. Both programs were broadcast around the world via the Dutch world service, and were syndicated by NPR, the CBC, ABC Radio National and All-India Radio, among many others.

Click on the audio links below to hear a selection of her work.

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Anik werkte een aantal jaren bij Radio Nederland Wereldomroep, als full-time producent en redacteur op de twee meest bekendste Engelstalige programma’s: Earth Beat en The State We’re In. Beide programma’s werden wereldwijd uitgezonden door de Wereldomroep, en zijn onder anderen ook op NPR, de CBC, ABC Radio National en All-India Radio te horen geweest. Haar radiowerk is ook te horen op CBC Radio’s Ideas, The Current, en Dispatches, ABC Radio National's Earshot en Hindsight, en Monocle.

Click op de onderstaande links om een selectie van haar werk te horen.

 

You've Got Mail

When was the last time you wrote a letter? When was the last time you received one, handwritten with feeling and slipped through the mail slot in your front door, or in the more and more frequently empty mailbox outside your house? A great deal of the mail most of us receive today is electronic, and a great deal of that is spam, or thrown straight into our computer trash bins. These days, sending a message to someone on the other side of the world can be done with a mere click, and it's hard to imagine a time when a message from a loved one could take two years to arrive. During the 17th and 18th centuries, the mail system was slow and haphazard - but also fascinating. Thanks to a trove of centuries-old Dutch letters found in the UK, we can see how it operated, and hear the stories of ordinary people reaching out to each other across a wide expanse of time and space.

Produced for ABC Radio National's feature documentary program Earshot.

An Ode to Solitude

In an increasingly populated and connected world, it’s becoming more and more difficult to find solitude. Not only that, the desire for solitude is increasingly seen as odd, and sometimes even threatening. But do we need solitude? Or are our busier environments more enriching than time alone ever could be? When was the last time you spent an enjoyable time alone in nature? Today many of us just don’t know how to cope with being alone, mistaking it for being lonely. Solitude seekers like solo sailor Henk de Velde, poet John Burnside, and writer Sara Maitland - who lives alone on a Scottish moor - reflect on the important differences between solitude and loneliness.

Produced for ABC Radio National's feature documentary program Earshot.

Photo by 401(K)

The Illusion of Money

We think we know what money is. We use it every day and our lives are unimaginable without it. But look more closely and you find that coins and dollar bills aren't "real". They're promises, symbols, ideas. And exactly what money is has evolved enormously over the ages. In this 2-part series, Anik explores how we're rethinking one of the most basic features of human society.

Produced for CBC Radio's Ideas.

A Carless Life

Our love affair with the car has turned into a relationship of dependence, shaping our lives, and our cities. But what if our lives were freer without them? Anik, who has travelled the world extensively by bike and never owned a car, explores carless lives across many generations and three continents.

For decades, the car has been touted as something that gives us independence. But congestion and cost are turning more and more people away from owning one. How do they see things differently, on bike or foot? And how are cities approaching alternatives to car ownership? Anik speaks with experts and citizens alike in Australia, Europe and North America, where car is king, and takes us on a brief tour of the world's ultimate carless city, Venice.

Produced for ABC Radio National's feature documentary program Earshot.

Photo by Rolfmueller via Wikimedia Commons

Who Owns Ancient Art?

When the Taliban and ISIS destroy ancient artifacts, the world responds with outrage. But where should that outrage lead: taking ancient art out of the country of origin? Or would that amount to what some have called neo-colonialism and cultural genocide? Just who owns ancient art? In the first part of this documentary series produced for CBC Radio's Ideas, a former antiquities smuggler and a U.S. Marine who developed an amnesty program for the return of thousands of items looted from the Iraqi National Museum discuss the intricacies and complexities of the issue. In the second part, James Cuno, CEO of the J. Paul Getty Trust and former curator at the Harvard Art Museums, the Courtauld Institute and the Art Institute of Chicago, presents the practice of partage as a solution, while Nika Collison, a member of the Haida Nation and curator at the Haida Gwaii Museum, relates the Haida's decades-long experience of repatriation of ancestral remains and sacred objects.

 

 

Rewilding

The world was once a place rich in biodiversity, and where humans had little influence on its landscape. But since we started harvesting resources on a massive scale, there have been wide-scale extinctions and an ongoing destruction of wilderness to a point where, in some places, nature feels "unnatural". A new movement is trying to correct some of that: a movement called 'rewilding', or allowing landscapes to resume a natural state. In an hour-long documentary on CBC Radio's Ideas, Anik takes a look at how we got to the state we're in, and at rewilding efforts in Canada, one of the wildest places on the planet, as well as The Netherlands, where things have reached a critical point.

 

Westvleteren beer

In the northwest corner of Belgium lies the Sint-Sixtus Abbey, which produces (very) limited runs of what is consistently declared the best beer in the world. The thing is, it’s not for commercial sale. You have to know when the abbey’s releasing their beer, call for days to get an appointment and drive there in person to pick it up. Anik tags along with one of its fans, who drives over 500 km roundtrip to claim his alloted two cases. Produced for Earth Beat.

Guilty Landscape

World War I started nearly one hundred years ago. As far as wars go, it was epic – ten million soldiers died in just four years. Over two million of them alone died on the Western Front near Ypres, and the landscape of Flanders was completely devastated.

Not a living tree or blade of grass survived. But are the marks of war still visible? What’s it like there now? To find out, Anik went there with her young son. Produced for Earth Beat.

 

The Art of Smuggling

Jonathan Tokeley-Parry spent three years behind bars for his role in smuggling artefacts out of Egypt. And he’s unrepentant, arguing that smuggling antiquities is the right thing to do if it gets them out of the hands of corrupt, incompetent officials. But Colonel Matthew Bogdanos could not disagree more. He’s both a Reservist in the US Marines, as well as a lawyer. He was in Iraq when the looting of the National Museum began, and moved quickly to recover its treasures. He’s worked across several continents and has even been shot at while on the job. Produced by Anik for The State We’re In, and presented by Jonathan Groubert. Winner of a bronze medal at the New York Festivals in 2011.